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family-circleJust like having an encyclopedia on family ancestors, the online site of Familypedia, is a web site with 167,770 online articles about deceased individuals plus another 277,546 genealogy-related pages and growing!

People are encouraged to create a new web page for any individual at any time. The best is that any user can also edit each existing page. If you have supplemental information about an individual you find already listed, or if you wish to correct an error on a page, you can do so within seconds. If you can type and click, you can edit almost every page in a wiki. Familypedia allows anyone to add or correct information, even without creating an account.

However, there are advantages to creating a free account. One is that you can work with a large number of people doing research on the same or similar surname. It covers the world, regions and nations everywhere help build Familypedia.

Many people like the available assistance to help when you can’t locate a specific ancestor. Either someone does know and has information or they have good suggestions of how to help.

Do a ‘search of this wiki’, placing a name. A listing with some basic information, given names, dates and locations will appear. That way you can narrow down the selection. Note there may even be references with the name or keyword as a location. That is good, family ties could be there and a good chance an ancestor was honored by a placed named for them.  family-group

On the left side, you can select from articles about individuals, or photos (which are all types of images), blogs, people or everything. Putting in a given name, even within quote marks, will search each word separately, like Harry not putting it with the surname.

If you don’t locate any ancestors, do create a listing of just few of those ancestors you have the most information on. Others will see that and may be able to build on it, giving you some links to other family members.

Related genealogy blogs:

Public Domain Photos

On Track for Family Research


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