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Museum of the Confederacy

confed flagThere is a huge amount of links and web sites devoted to the soldiers of the US Federal Union during the American Civil War (1861-1865); especially with the 150th anniversary. Locating information and particularly photos of the Confederacy can be harder.

Online is a site titled: The Museum of the Confederacy, with a variety of collections and archives all related to the southern side in the war. Along the left side are the topics to select from: artifacts, photographs, collections, Lee & Jackson, etc. It has links at the top for the sites titled: Richmond, Appomattox and White House of the Confederacy for even more resources.

Confed. revolver

To start searching:  Looking at the fine collection of 19th century photos and images of artifacts at the Museum of the Confederacy can also show the collection of transcription of telegrams, messages, orders, letters, journals exchanged during the war. You could search by a surname, a hometown, a regiment, a battle, etc. Any number of documents or images could be available.

Confed. coat

The photos of artifacts is very helpful, images of Confederacy buttons, flags, guns, swords; many with descriptions and historical information. There could be a link with a regiment name, flag, telegram on an ancestor you did not know existed.

Checking surnames you could come across a ‘person’s record’, a brief write-up of that individual’s involved – civilian or soldier for the South. Confed-FlemingEspecially exciting to locate would be a photo of the soldier.  So start checking out the site.

Photos: 1862 -1st South Carolina Infantry battalion ”Charleston Light Infantry” flag. Revolver from Rutledge Mounted Riflemen; 4th South Carolina Cavalry Co K, ”Charleston Light Dragoons” used by  Private John Rhodes Waring of Pinopolis, Berkely County, South Carolina. Frock coat of Captain John Livingston Ingli of the 3rd Florida Infantry, Co. D. ”Wakulla Guards”. Charles Seton Fleming from Florida, he was killed in a skirmish at Gaines Farm, Virginia, June 3, 1864, while leading a gallant charge at Cold Harbor. He was buried where he died on the battlefield.


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