ancestor

  • Genealogy and History – Interwoven Together

    Apr 18

    The recent coverage of the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the RMS Titanic with books, magazine articles, news reports, documentaries and movies has reminded everyone how certain historical events can play such important defining moment in nearly everyone’s lives.  Certainly those survivors of the Titanic, the descendants of those who did n...

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  • Go Back and Use IGI and Pedigree Resources

    Apr 17

    Two sources many times overlooked by researchers are the IGI (International Genealogical Index) and the Pedigree Resource File (PRF).  Both of these are and have been for decades available free through FamilySearch.org.  They can also be accessed at any of the Family History Centers across the country or overseas. So using either one is simple...

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  • Crossing the Canadian Border at Detroit

    Apr 15

    With such a long border between the United States and Canada, some 3,987 miles just with the lower 48 states, there are several official locations that people can cross to visit or immigrate into the country. One of the major places to cross is at the Port of Detroit in Michigan coming from Ontario province into the United States. Other nearby entr...

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  • The Titanic’s Fateful Night

    Apr 14

      On April 14, 1912, about 11:40 pm the unsinkable Titanic struck an iceberg and by 2:20 am of the early Monday morning, April 15th, the great luxury ship on its maiden voyage did sink into the icy cold waters of the Atlantic. There were 1,576 people from all walks of life who died that night.  Only 710 survivors made it alive to New York ...

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  • Key Ideas When Researching Your Ancestors

    Apr 9

    You are just beginning or you have worked for awhile on putting together your family history. No matter what the situation, everyone comes across some stumbling blocks, those ancestors you don’t know where to research or you just not sure which direction to proceed with. Here are some key ideas to try when you’re stumped.  First, remember y...

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  • What Were They Doing in 1940?

    Apr 8

    With all the excitement over the last couple of week with the release on April 2nd of the 1940 U. S. Federal Census, this is such a perfect time to investigate about those ancestors who lived in 1940 and were counted in that census.  Of special interest would be the ones that were young adults or older. A good starting point is with photographs...

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  • Those Strange Abbreviations

    Apr 7

    You will at least once in doing family history research come across an ancestor belonging to a fraternal or civic organization. Long before television and computers occupied most of a person’s free-time, being a member of several organizations and clubs in a town or city was a very popular activity.  It offered a social meeting place, a sense of...

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  • World War I and II Assistance

    Apr 5

    Two of the greatest military conflicts during the 20th century were the ‘Great War’ - later known as World War I and then less than 20 years later the second great war, this one being World War II.  No one can say they did not have a relative or ancestor involved somehow in either of those conflicts and in some cases served in both. Now it ...

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  • My First Find on the 1940 Census

    Apr 3

    It was 9 a.m. on Monday morning, April 2nd along the east coast and I started by searching on the newly released 1940 US Federal Census on Ancestry.com.  The only locations with images available at that point in time on the first day were nine states (California, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Nevada, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia)....

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  • 1940 Census Day Has Arrived

    Apr 2

    The time has arrived, what every family history researcher has been waiting for -- the April 1940 U. S. Federal Census, available today at 9 a.m.  Of course that does not mean you can click on any database now to find your ancestors in 1940. View this short 3 minute video supplied by the National Census Archives, holders of the census, to bette...

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