ancestors

  • Newspaper Boys of Early 1900s

    Dec 31

    Little is known today about the life of those young boys in large cities who sold the daily newspaper on the street. This was not an after school job as it would become in the 1940s and beyond. At the end of the 19th century and into the early 20th century, the young boys selling newspapers were termed 'Newsies'. This was their life, usuall...

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  • ‘Doughnut Girls’ of World War One

    Dec 29

    During the Great War for USA (1917-1919), many women wanted to help life a little nicer for the soldiers. Four women working for the Salvation Army who, while providing snacks and Christian activities for the soldiers, had the idea that serving up some doughnuts ( a rare treat because of rationing) would perhaps do more to life the men’s mo...

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  • Popular Christmas Dinner Items 100 Years Ago

    Dec 25

    Our ancestors did look forward to a special dinner served on Christmas Day. It was truly the day for the family and exceptional, favorite foods. One item special was to have a variety of meat prepared and serviced. For that Christmas dinner, there could be fish, venison, roast beef, a crown of roast pork. It became more the practice after 1...

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  • White Christmas Movie

    Dec 24

    Christmas-themed Hollywood movies have been popular for decades. There is even a museum in Ohio with movie items with the Christmas theme. One special Christmas movie made in 1954 is a true classic and favorite. Another museum 'Upcountry History Museum' is having a special exhibit just on 'White Christmas' movie marking its 66th anniversa...

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  • The Meaning of Christmas & Holiday Sayings

    Dec 23

    Many terms have been used over the decades by our ancestors and maybe lost by the 21 century. It might be interesting to review some of these sayings as they relate to the holiday season. One item present in the cold winter and places that get snow at Christmas time is Hogamadog. It is the act of rolling snow along the ground to make larg...

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  • Favorite Christmas Toys over the Early 20th Century

    Dec 19

    You may well know which were your grandparents or parents favorite toys at Christmas. But here are some reminders of what was popular during the early 20th century. An all-time favorite has been a Teddy Bear. It started in 1902, when President Theodore Roosevelt refused to shoot a tied-up, defenseless black bear during a hunting trip in Mis...

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  • Carnival Glass Heirlooms

    Dec 13

    You just might have some pieces of 'carnival glass' heirlooms but did not know their history. So carnival glass dates back to 1907 started by Fenton Art Glass Co. and production was big until about 1925. Other companies also produced carnival glass items around the globe. Prior to carnival glass, your ancestors main type of glass piec...

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  • Christmas Traditions of Pioneer Ancestors

    Dec 9

    If you had 'pioneer' ancestors, those who lived in the 1700s to early 1900s in any wilderness, isolated regions of America, it is fascinating to examine what Christmas traditions they celebrated. The first celebration of Christmas didn't really expand as a big important holiday until the mid-1800s; yet it was the Southern States that had real...

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  • Home Remedies

    Dec 5

    Today one gets doctor's prescriptions or over the counter medicine when needed. However, your ancestors did not always have a doctor nearby, or a drug store or even be able to afford medicine. So traditionally home remedies were used for many physical problems. Home remedies or 'old-fashion cures' have been done in households for hund...

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  • Older Traditional Manners

    Dec 3

    There had been for decades a set group of traditional manners expected of all individuals, especially taught to children. These your parents, grandparents, gr grandparents, etc grew up and followed. Here are some traditional good behaviors: A child was never to argue with an adult, with what the adult said, especially if a parent spoke...

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