family tree research

  • Ancestry.com

    Oct 26

    Ancestry.com is one of the most popular websites for genealogy. They are the world's largest online resource for family trees, and documents that genealogists need for their family history research. What kinds of resources can you find here? In addition to birth, marriage, and death records from the United States and around the world, you c...

    More

  • District of Columbia Genealogy

    Oct 19

    This district, is not a state, rather a territory founded on July 16, 1790 to serve as the young nation’s federal capital. A new "federal city" was then constructed on the north bank of the Potomac River, to the east of the established settlement at Georgetown in Maryland, personally selected by President George Washington. Land for the distri...

    More

  • 1890 Census

    Oct 18

    Working with the U. S. Federal censuses from 1790 to 1930 are wonderful sources for learning about one’s ancestors. You are fortunate if you can locate and follow an ancestor over decades. It provides real insight of occupations, family members, where they lived, if they served in the military or owned property. The U. S. Federal census was ...

    More

  • Famous Ancestors?

    Oct 18

    Anyone who has started genealogical research has hoped to come across a famous ancestor. Maybe Daniel Boone was a third great granduncle or Martha Washington was a distance cousin. It is fun and a bit intriguing to think of the possibilities. Then there are the family legends and tales handed down over the generations of being related to a well-...

    More

  • Importance of Collateral Lines

    Oct 18

    Everyone has collateral lines in the family tree. Those are the relatives who are not part of direct lineage, but of the same ancestral line. Such ancestors would be the uncles, aunts, granduncles, second cousins and in-laws of the family. When completing a family tree it is the direct lineage that is recorded, such as parents, grandparents,...

    More

  • Deception and Swindles in Genealogy

    Oct 18

    There can be genealogical web sites on the Internet which make fraudulent claims. Certain things should be checked before signing up for any program. One good item is if the site offers a free trial. It can be for a week, 14 days or a month. Test out the site, see if it is what you really need and can use successfully. Look for a contact addre...

    More

  • Using City Directories

    Oct 18

    City directories date back to around 1700 in the United States region. They can provide the names of it citizens, their home and business addresses, spouse's name plus other people who live in the same household. For the family historian the information in city directories can open up new information previously unknown. Identification of an a...

    More

  • Untapped Project Gutenberg and Google Books

    Oct 18

    Back in 1971, Michael Hart, developed the idea of the today’s popular e-book (electronic books) being accessible on the Internet. He then elaborated the concept into Project Gutenberg. Maintaining the project is done by volunteers. They take the printed work and put it into digital format. The goal is to provide as many eBooks, in as many format...

    More

  • Civil War Records & Information

    Oct 18

    The American Civil War, also referred to as the War Between the States, is the most researched, written about and material collected compared to any other historic event. Over 150 years later, the story of that war with brother against brother, captures everyone’s interest, especially in reference to genealogical research. If any branch of one’...

    More

  • Saving A Piece of History for Future Generations. Four Resources.

    Oct 18

    A family historian is always on the lookout for any photo, document, vital record, letter, or receipt that helps piece together the threads of life about an ancestor. Besides checking with other family members, including some newly located distance cousins, one never knows where the next fascinating old photo or letter might surface on the Internet...

    More