family tree research

  • The U. S. Military Pension File

    Oct 18

    If an ancestor served, even for a short time, there maybe a military record kept by the Federal government. Unfortunately, a massive fire swept through on July 12, 1973 the storage building in St. Louis, Missouri where the military records were kept. The building which housed 17 million military records was destroyed and with it most of the milit...

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  • Social Security Death Index and S. S. Records

    Oct 18

    Social Security Records and the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) are great resources for investigating about your more recent ancestors. It was August 1935, when the first Social Security applications were filled out in the United States. The cards with a person’s name and social security number were then issued in early 1936. Years later socia...

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  • Family History Research With Google Part Two

    Oct 18

    Another idea is to use the word ’allintitle’ (all in title) then a colon and the phrase such as Bridge genealogy. The example is: allintitle: Bridge genealogy. Google will find the requested phrase, capture some additional genealogy web pages about the surname usually buried deep in the search results. The tilde ~ symbol is Google's newest o...

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  • Family History Research With Google Part One

    Oct 18

    Google as a search engine on the Internet has become an invaluable tool for family history researchers. This powerful search engine produces accurate and relevant search results, plus being particularly flexible. The key is the search keywords that are placed in the search box. You want the words that are most likely to appear on the web page yo...

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  • Research Newspapers For Your Ancestors

    Oct 18

    Ancestors have a long trail of documents from birth to death which can greatly assist the researcher. Most come from government agencies; either federal, state, county or city. There are also church records along with civic and fraternal organizations where information can be gathered on relatives. One of the great gold mines with a wealth of ...

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  • Know the Epidemics That Might Have Affected Your Ancestors

    Oct 18

    Epidemics have always had a great influence our ancestors, making it sometimes very difficult to trace what happened to the relatives. There are instances when individuals disappeared from most conventional records; tax rolls, deeds, voting records, censuses and the researcher does not know why. In many cases it could have been a major epidemic str...

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  • Searching Common Surnames

    Oct 18

    One of the most frustrating research projects is looking for an ancestor who has a very common surname. To see what a researcher is up against, in the United States alone there are some 2,000 common surnames. Ranked as number one most common surname in the United States is ‘Smith.’ Then, follows the next nine names based on the 2000 U. S....

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  • Understanding Differences

    Oct 18

    The Difference in Baptism and Christening One of the major primary sources in genealogical research is locating a baptism record. These were issued at the time of a baby, child or even adult’s bestowing of their Christian name and the person’s identification with Christianity and the church. The term, christening, is also used. Is there...

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  • Saving Your Research

    Oct 18

    If you have only been working on your genealogy project for a few weeks or for years the number one activity you must complete is to make copies of your work. You start off most times by writing out your basic family tree, notes of sources and collecting vital records. Keep them secure in a notebook or filing cabinet. That beginning material s...

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  • Research the Hometowns of Your Ancestors

    Oct 18

    A family’s ancestral home can be a rural village, a small town, a medium-sized city or a large metropolis. Learning about the particular location; its people, occupations, traditions and history can give a researcher enormous insight into their own family. Traditionally individuals and their descendants remained in a given region for decades ...

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