surnames

  • Getting the Most from the U. S. 1880 Federal Census

    Oct 5

    The 1880 U.S. Federal Census, under U.S. President was Rutherford B. Hayes, was the tenth enumeration of the United States population and represented more than a 30% growth in the country compared to the 1870 census. Many of our ancestors came from Europe, Canada, South America or Asia during the 1860s and 1870s, so it is understandable the nationâ...

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  • Searching for Living Relatives

    Jul 1

    A family researcher spends a great deal of time looking for primary vital documents to learn about those relatives who have passed away.  However, one of the aspects of looking for those who have died, are also finding living relatives. By learning of a cousin or an aunt, previously unknown to the researcher and who could still be alive is just as...

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  • Your Ancestors Did What for a Living??

    Jun 13

    That can be the immediate response when someone learns your great grandfather was an ‘amanuensis’ or a ‘colporteur.’  There are numerous occupations our ancestors did that had some strange and unusual names.  Many of those jobs do not even exist anymore. The ‘amanuensis’ is what a secretary was referred to as a profession.  The te...

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  • Family History Research With Google Part One

    Oct 18

    Google as a search engine on the Internet has become an invaluable tool for family history researchers. This powerful search engine produces accurate and relevant search results, plus being particularly flexible. The key is the search keywords that are placed in the search box. You want the words that are most likely to appear on the web page yo...

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  • Searching Common Surnames

    Oct 18

    One of the most frustrating research projects is looking for an ancestor who has a very common surname. To see what a researcher is up against, in the United States alone there are some 2,000 common surnames. Ranked as number one most common surname in the United States is ‘Smith.’ Then, follows the next nine names based on the 2000 U. S....

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  • An Ancestor’s Given Name

    Oct 18

    The use of one, two or even three and four given names added to the family surname for a newborn baby is a fairly recent family tradition. The naming of a baby is not taken lightly, but rather is a matter of tradition, heritage, and respect to another person, relative, virtue, religion or institution. Centuries ago when a person might be named b...

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